Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> i don't think those demands are going away. part of the point of the short-term debt ceiling extension just passed last week was sort of to try and leverage their position in the sequester-related discussion of $1.2 trillion of autoic spending cuts set to kick in on march 1st which are delayed two months with the fiscal cliff deal. they're hoping to extract spending cuts from president obama. if not that fight, then in the next debt ceiling fight the next debt ceiling fight. the demand nor spending cuts isn't going to go anywhere. >> bill: barney frank, he would be fired up, ready to go. he knows she is issues. he knows the fiscal issues better than anybody else. >> deval patrick said he would be happy to have him. he didn't endorse it per se but he expressed sort of opens to the idea. >> wouldn't be a big learning curve for barney. >> bill: no, not at all. i think it would be very tough for governor patrick not to appoint him. i mean who else could step in and have all of the information and all of the experience you need to really fight for the people. >> i was going to say
to raise taxes. two major points are coming up. the continuing resolution and the debt ceiling -- both of those are coming up in the next couple of months. those are leverage points that are the mirror image of the fiscal cliff. those are leverage points that if nothing passes the result is not a default on the debt. that is scaremongering by the president. the result is a temporary partial government shutdown, and we have seen that movie before, 1995, when republicans stood together and the result was some political pain, to be sure, but it was also year after year of balanced budgets, some of the most fiscally as possible policies we have seen -- it's possible policies we have seen in modern times. [applause] the only hope of getting anything affirmative done is going to come from those leverage points he cuts president obama has indicated, sadly, he has no interest in being bill clinton, tacking to the middle, compromising with anybody. the only way we are going to restrain the out-of-control spending and that that is threatening our future is to use the leverage points to force rea
the dysfunction in washington as much as we were even though we do have the debt ceiling fight on the horizon. that's taken a back seat to this momentum in stocks. >> yeah, absolutely. i think that investors should be braced for a potential pullback, but trying to trade it i think is perilous. look, would i have expected a fairly significant pullback in december based on the uncertainty of the fiscal cliff debate. it didn't happen. i think that we were at that time telling our clients to look through the potential weakness and focus on the value and the fact that equities are very likely to be higher in a year from now, concentrate on the longer run, invest, don't trade and we think you'll be well served by that. >> give me your best idea right here then, eric. >> well, i think equities. simply the equity trade. >> what do you remember want to do, etfs, my spector sectors, etfs, how do you do it? >> very broadly. we're an active manager and use a multi-manager approach so we're broadly diversified across countries. emerging markets looks better than developed and procyclical stocks look bette
the difference here is unlike the debt ceiling which has the huge, global third party implications whether the government refinances itself, this is an invention of congress. they've decided please, tie my hands so i don't do it again. i do think therefore there's flexibility in whether they defer it or somehow play it some other way. >> bill: michael our guest finance writer for yahoo. all of this revolves, of course around the debt and the deficit. isn't it also true that we've made significant paydowns of the debt now and that's not -- so big, right but not as serious a problem as it was a year ago. >> this i think is kind of the under tone. it is not being talked about loudly. i do think it is the context for a lot of decisions. no debt has gotten paid down. we're running annual deficits. the absolute size of the government's debt gets bigger but the size of the deaf -- deficits have gone to under a trillion a year this year which no changes no effort really to actually do anything except for the economy to improve tax receipts to go up and you know, lower spending on sort of income su
is expected to vote this afternoon on a bill to suspend the debt ceiling for three months, following the house. this would allow more house for debate on the fiscal issues we're facing. the senate version includes several republican amendments, though, including matching spending cuts for every dollar increase in the debt ceiling. those amendments expected to be defeated. the bill won't technically raise the debt ceiling, but it will suspend it until may 19th when it will be raised by the amount that the treasury borrows in the interim. that's how it's going to work. and markets, as we've been talking about on a tear this month with the dow having its best january in decades. but will yesterday's surprising drop in gdp reign in the bulls, it says here? let's get a read on the state of the economy. at least it wasn't a -- that kind of rein. there's three of them. anyway, joining us for the next hour is bob bruska. that's fao -- >> no. you cannot. >> fao economics. as becky said at the top, things are going to go really well or the market is going to have an '87 crash. >> i like the binary outlo
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)